Captured Wings Wiki
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{{Airframe info
[[File:430729aveparts2.jpg|right|400px|<ref>Image of 42-30146 being dismantled from http://www.flensted.eu.com/19430073.shtml</ref>]]
 
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|name='''''{{PAGENAME}}'''''
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|image=[[File:430729aveparts2.jpg|right|300px]]
 
|caption=42-30146 being dismantled<ref>Image from [http://www.flensted.eu.com/19430073.shtml Flensted]</ref>
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|designation=Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress
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|version=F-90-BO
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}}
   
 
=History=
'''42-30146''' was a [[:Category:Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress|Boeing B-17F-90-BO Fortress]]
 
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Built by Boeing as c/n '''5260''', 42-30146 was assigned to 333rd BS, 94th BG, recieving the name Down and Go.
   
 
Captured during a mission to Warnemunde on 29 July 1943,<ref name="USAAF B-17F-90-BO">http://cgibin.rcn.com/jeremy.k/cgi-bin/gzUsafSearch.pl?target=&content=B-17F-90-BO</ref> the aircraft, piloted by Lieutenant Ned Palmer, begun to develop problems soon after take off. Both inner engines failed and the pilot was forced to disable them. However, the crew wanted to drop some bombs on Germany, and flew forward. Shortly before reaching the target, engine number four overheated, and the pilot had to disable it too.{{#tag:ref|USAAF Serial records webpage states the aircraft had been hit by flak.<ref name="USAAF B-17F-90-BO"/>|group="N"}} The navigator set course for Sweden, but the plane landed on a Wehrmacht exercise field in Avedore Holme, Denmark. Encircled by German soldiers, the crew was able to destroy the aircraft's secret Norden sight. The aircraft was then transported to Kastrup, Denmark and repaired by Heinkel plants' engineers. After repairs and the traditional period of trials in Rechlin, the plane was transferred to [[:Category:KG-200|KG 200]] in Spring 1944,<ref>http://www.warbirdsresourcegroup.org/LRG/b17fortress.html</ref> recieving ID code '''A3+EE''', which was later changed to '''A3+BB'''.
==History==
 
Built as c/n 5260, 42-30146 was assigned to 333rd BS, 94th BG, receiving the name *Down and Go*. During a mission to Warnemunde on 29 July 1943,<ref name="USAAF B-17F-90-BO">http://cgibin.rcn.com/jeremy.k/cgi-bin/gzUsafSearch.pl?target=&content=B-17F-90-BO</ref> the aircraft, piloted by Lieutenant Ned Palmer, begun to develop problems soon after take off. Both inner engines failed and pilot was forced to disable them. Crew wanted to drop some bombs on Germany and flew forward. Shortly before target engine number four overheated and pilot had to disable it too.{{#tag:ref|USAAF Serial records webpage states the aircraft had been hit by flak.<ref name="USAAF B-17F-90-BO"/>|group="N"}} Navigator set course on Sweden but plane has landed on Wehrmacht exercise field in Avedore Holme, Denmark. Plane was encircled by German soldiers but crew was able to destroy secret Norden sight. Plane was transported to Kastrup, Denmark and was repaired by Heinkel plants' engineers. After repairs and traditional period of trials in Rechlin, the plane was transfered to KG 200 in Spring 1944 and coded A3+EE, later becoming A3+BB.<ref>http://www.warbirdsresourcegroup.org/LRG/b17fortress.html</ref>
 
   
On 9 February 1945 the aircraft exploded on takeoff, killing crew and 10 Vichy agents.<ref name="USAAF B-17F-90-BO"/>
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On 9 February 1945 the aircraft exploded on takeoff, killing the crew and 10 Vichy agents.<ref name="USAAF B-17F-90-BO"/>
   
 
=Notes=
==References==
 
===Notes===
 
 
<references group="N"/>
 
<references group="N"/>
===Sources===
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=Sources=
 
<references/>
 
<references/>
 
[[Category:World War 2]]
 
[[Category:World War 2]]
 
[[Category:Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress]]
 
[[Category:Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress]]
[[Category:Individual Aircraft]]
 
 
[[Category:KG-200]]
 
[[Category:KG-200]]

Latest revision as of 15:37, 6 September 2017


History[]

Built by Boeing as c/n 5260, 42-30146 was assigned to 333rd BS, 94th BG, recieving the name Down and Go.

Captured during a mission to Warnemunde on 29 July 1943,[2] the aircraft, piloted by Lieutenant Ned Palmer, begun to develop problems soon after take off. Both inner engines failed and the pilot was forced to disable them. However, the crew wanted to drop some bombs on Germany, and flew forward. Shortly before reaching the target, engine number four overheated, and the pilot had to disable it too.[N 1] The navigator set course for Sweden, but the plane landed on a Wehrmacht exercise field in Avedore Holme, Denmark. Encircled by German soldiers, the crew was able to destroy the aircraft's secret Norden sight. The aircraft was then transported to Kastrup, Denmark and repaired by Heinkel plants' engineers. After repairs and the traditional period of trials in Rechlin, the plane was transferred to KG 200 in Spring 1944,[3] recieving ID code A3+EE, which was later changed to A3+BB.

On 9 February 1945 the aircraft exploded on takeoff, killing the crew and 10 Vichy agents.[2]

Notes[]

  1. USAAF Serial records webpage states the aircraft had been hit by flak.[2]

Sources[]