History[edit | edit source]

A low-wing cabin monoplane with twin piston engines and a tailwheel undercarriage, A-26 (Ki-77) No 1 was derived from a design commissioned by a newspaper to break the flight distance record set by a rival. Due to war preparations nothing came of the intended non-stop flight to Berlin, but the plan was revived when an Italian plane managed to visit Japan. It was the intention that the 2nd prototype should make the attempt, but it vanished during the flight, probably shot down by long-range allied fighters.[1] The sole remaining first prototype of the Tachikawa Ki-77, that in the meantime had been used to set an inland distance record, was found by US forces at the end of the war at Yamanashi airfield in Japan. The aircraft was given the designation USAAF FE-154 and shipped to the United States aboard the escort aircraft carrier USS Bogue (CVE-9) from Yokosuka on 16 December 1945. It arrived at NAS Alameda, California on 8 January 1946, where it was examined before being scrapped.

Sources[edit | edit source]

  1. Francillon 1979, p.264.

Bibliography[edit | edit source]

  • Francillon, René J. Japanese Aircraft of the Pacific War. London: Putnam Aeronautical, 1979. ISBN 0-370-30251-6.
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