History[edit | edit source]

This aircraft was surrendered to US forces in May 1945[3] at the Dornier factory of Oberpfaffenhofen to the west of Munich, and was flown under supervision to the airfield of Neubiberg, to the south east of the city, with a number of other Do 335s. It was later handed over to the British Air Intelligence organisation,[N 2] where it became Air Min 223, and was flown from Neubiberg to Strasbourg and Reims on 7th September 1945 by S/L McCarthy. On the following day it continued to Farnborough via Manston. It made a test flight on 1st October 1945 but then remained grounded until a second test flight on 15th January 1946, appearing in the meantime in the static display of the German Aircraft Exhibition. On 18th January 1946 it made a third test flight and caught fire in the air after the rear engine overheated and crashed at Cove near Farnborough, killing G/C Alan F. Hards, C.O. Experimental Flying at Farnborough. Severe restrictions were placed on the flying of ex-Luftwaffe aircraft at Farnborough after this accident,[2] which had been caused by the fire in the rear engine burning through the elevator control cables.[4]

Notes[edit | edit source]

  1. This was a two-seat trainer version.[2]
  2. RCAF Squadron Leader Joe McCarthy had traded 15 Focke-Wulf Fw 190 single engine fighters to the USAAF for this aircraft.[3]

Sources[edit | edit source]

  1. http://www.aeroflight.co.uk/tag/do-335
  2. 2.0 2.1 http://www.rafcommands.com/forum/showthread.php?6688-Cranwell-1934
  3. 3.0 3.1 Luftwaffe Warplane Survivors
  4. Brown, Eric Melrose. Wings of the Luftwaffe. The Crowood Press Ltd - New edition (14 Feb 1998). ISBN 1853104132. Page 77
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